10th November 2023

Leading Police Improvement: VAWG, digitalisation and protest

The conference is now ready to go with some great workshops in October we have a lot to discuss and a great set of speakers. There is still time to register for free online places at Eventbrite. Use the link: Leading police improvement VAWG, Digitalisation and Public Order Tickets, Fri 10 Nov 2023 at 09:30 | Eventbrite 

The 2023 Conference

We are proud to launch the London Policing College 5th International Police Education Conference. We are very pleased to collaborate with partners in the University of West London and the National Forensic Science University of India to consider practical issues for contemporary policing and how these can be addressed. Our intention is through a series of workshops and a conference to consider three main issues and gaining insights to improve policing and support front line officers. To this end the conference will involve a series of panels and presentations and we want the audience to be fully involved in shaping the event through posting questions and comments in the chat bar.

The workshops held in October brought together over 1,000 practitioners, academics, and professionals from more than 30 countries. The discussions uncovered several themes.

Workshops on Public Protest concluded:

A core theme was the importance of balance and consensus in public order policing. Achieving this equilibrium is critical for facilitating lawful protests while precisely defining what constitutes a "lawful protest." Effective communication emerged as a linchpin, particularly as protest dynamics evolve, encompassing new categories such as civil disobedience. The unique nature of Extinction Rebellion's approach, involving organised peaceful law-breaking, sparked a debate about how the police should adapt to existential threats like climate change. The conference participants debated whether the police should adjust their approach in response to protests linked to climate change, given the issue's existential importance to society. While some argued for adaptation in light of the crisis's severity, others emphasised the importance of police impartiality and adherence to the law within a democratic society.

Workshops on VAWG concluded:

In addition to many specific needs for officers and leaders the workshops identified the multifaceted nature of addressing violence against women and girls. It emphasised the importance of a collaborative, informed, and empathetic approach in policing.The workshop provided a comprehensive overview of the challenges and strategies related to combating VAWG. It emphasized the importance of proactive measures, responsible technology use, and a collaborative approach involving law enforcement, communities, and society at large. There was considerable discussion about the development of a cyber secure model for women and the need for a focus on escape and protection rather than enforcement. The insights shared by the panellists underscore the need for a holistic response to ensure the safety and security of women and girls in a rapidly changing world.

Workshops on Digitalisation concluded:

The integration of digital skills into mainstream policing is crucial to address the growing digital component in criminal activities. Police need to invest in training, technology, and support to ensure that officers can effectively combat digital crimes while protecting their mental health. As technology continues to advance, officers must be equipped with the necessary skills and support to serve justice and safeguard their well-being.The workshop underscored the growing influence of AI and the Dark Web on cybercrime and the challenges they pose to law enforcement agencies. To address these challenges effectively, law enforcement agencies should prioritize technology education, training, and collaboration with external partners. Investing in digital awareness and skills is crucial to adapt to the evolving landscape of cybercrime and ensure that law enforcement remains effective and secure.

Full conference

Taking these themes forwarded the conference will have three sections. The first will include contributions from Chief Constable BJ Harrington QPM, Chief Constable Steve Watson QPM, former HMI Matt Parr CB and Dr Rick Muir of the Police Foundation. They will discuss the policing context from the strategic level, identifying key themes for action. The second will include a keynote address from Professor Betsy Stanko OBE on the development of Operation Soteria and three separate panels to work on the outcome from the workshops.

• Digitalisation: Stuart Hyde QPM, Georgina Morgan (Tech UK), Dean Watkinson (CCL)

• Protest: Roger Gomm QPM, Chief Constable BJ Harrington, Assistant Chief Constable Mark Williams (NPCC), Professor Denise Martin Abertay University

• VAWG: Parm Sandhu, Professor Betsy Stanko, Lizzie Peters (MOPAC), Yasmin Khan (Halo)

The third and final section will bring this together to look at the way forward and will include key speakers from the day and Pro Vice Chancellor Adrian Ellison from the University of West London.

 

We would like to thank our sponsors and supporters without whom this free event would not be possible. These include:

Policing Insight

Oxford University Press

University of West London

Policing TV

Leading Police Improvement: Violence Against Women and Girls, Digitalization, and Public Protest

Overview of workshop output

 

The 5th Police Education Conference, November 10, 2023, promises to be a platform for leading police improvement. It will dissect the complexities surrounding Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG), digitalization, and public protest, focusing on outcomes drawn from enlightening workshops held in October. These workshops brought together over 1,000 practitioners, academics, and professionals from more than 30 countries, making the conference an incubator of innovation and ideas to bolster law enforcement performance. The discussions uncovered critical themes that demand attention and action to maintain police legitimacy and public trust in an ever-evolving world.

 

The 5th Police Education Conference is set to be an exciting event in the realm of policing. It brings to the forefront the critical themes of Violence Against Women and Girls, digitalization, and public protest. The insights gained from the five enlightening workshops provide a solid foundation for addressing these key challenges in modern law enforcement.

  • The need for effective communication, community engagement, and adaptability in public order policing emphasizes the evolving role of the police in a rapidly changing world, particularly in the context of climate change activism.
  • The discussion on Violence Against Women and Girls highlights the importance of collaboration, specialized training, and comprehensive support to address this critical issue.
  • The focus on enhancing digital skills recognizes the pivotal role of technology in contemporary law enforcement and the importance of protecting officers' well-being.
  • The challenges in combating cybercrime in the era of AI and the Dark Web underscore the need for law enforcement agencies to prioritize technology education, training, and collaboration.

To lead police improvement successfully, a proactive, holistic, and adaptive approach is imperative. The 5th Police Education Conference promises to be a catalyst for change, assisting police identify the tools and insights needed to thrive in a complex and ever-changing world. 

 

Overview of Content from Workshops

Below is some of the fascinating and informative output from the five workshops which the conference will build on. Fuller reports will be attached in due course.

Navigating Public Order Policing and Communication Challenges

The first workshop, chaired by Roger Gomm QPM, delved into the intricate domain of public order policing and its vital connection to effective communication in managing protests, especially in the context of climate change activism. 

The panel of speakers featured distinguished individuals, each bringing a unique perspective:

Roger Hallam: Co-founder of Extinction Rebellion, who shared experiences related to organizing civil disobedience movements.

Simon Ovens DLL: A former police officer with 37 years of experience in public order policing and leadership.

Beverly Griffiths: A senior lecturer and researcher specializing in organizational risk and resilience, particularly in emergency response.

Bob Broadhurst OBE QPM: A former police officer with 36 years of experience, who served as the head of public order for the Metropolitan Police Service and possesses extensive knowledge of public order policing.

Key discussion points emerged from this session:

Effective Communication: Acknowledging the need for improved communication within the police force, the workshop emphasized the indispensable role of effective communication in managing public order situations.

Managing Peaceful Protests: The workshop included Roger Hallam the co-founder of Extinction Rebellion and he set out his approach to protest. He expanded the concept of civil disobedience, highlighting the importance of organized peaceful protests within legal boundaries and the role of the police in facilitating lawful demonstrations. Especially the problems caused for the police when the demonstrators set out to get arrested but do it in a way which leads to negative images for the police.

Media Challenges: Challenges in police-media communication and reputation management were discussed, underscoring the significance of maintaining a positive public image. Especially in the light of the use of civil disobedience and protestors from several demographic groups.

Community Engagement: The importance of engaging with partners and the business community was highlighted, emphasizing the need for collaboration and open lines of communication.

Discussion Highlights

A core theme that emerged from this workshop was the importance of balance and consensus in public order policing. Achieving this equilibrium is critical for facilitating lawful protests while precisely defining what constitutes a "lawful protest." Effective communication emerged as a linchpin, particularly as protest dynamics evolve, encompassing new categories such as civil disobedience. The unique nature of Extinction Rebellion's approach, involving organised peaceful law-breaking, sparked a debate about how the police should adapt to existential threats like climate change.

The conference participants debated whether the police should adjust their approach in response to protests linked to climate change, given the issue's existential importance to society. While some argued for adaptation in light of the crisis's severity, others emphasised the importance of police impartiality and adherence to the law within a democratic society.

Addressing Violence Against Women and Girls - A Comprehensive Overview

The second workshop, chaired by Parm Sandhu, provided an extensive overview of this critical issue. The session encompassed various topics, including the Police Super Complaint initiative, trauma-informed approaches, cybersecurity, law enforcement practices, international cooperation, multi-agency collaboration, and the effectiveness of the current legal framework. The panel included:

Yasmin Khan: Director and founder of the Halo Project Charity in the Northeast of England.

Detective Superintendent Gary Miles: Gary Miles head of the National Sport Intelligence Bureau, focused on fraud and cybercrime. 

Leigh Beek:  a former senior police officer with 30 years of service in the Metropolitan Police and the National Crime Agency.

These are the key takeaways:

Police Super Complaint: The workshop scrutinized the Police Super Complaint initiative's role in addressing policing disproportionality, particularly in cases of honour-based abuse and disproportionate use of voluntary suspect interviews. It highlighted the significance of involving non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and other entities in investigating and addressing these complex cases.

Trauma-Informed Approach: Participants stressed the need for a trauma-informed approach when dealing with victims of sexual abuse. The focus was on ensuring victim safety and providing protective measures, requiring a change in focus on performance measures towards escape from violence.

Cyber Security: The exploitation of online spaces for targeting women and girls is on the rise. This workshop emphasized the importance of enhancing cybersecurity measures to counter this growing threat.

Training and Implementation: Participants acknowledged the necessity of specialized training for law enforcement officers to effectively address violence against women and girls. Implementing this training in real-life scenarios is crucial, with an emphasis on understanding the specific risks and needs of different communities.

Multi-Agency Approach: Collaboration between various agencies and organisations was recognised as essential to address the complexity of violence against women and girls effectively.

Building Trust: Challenges in building trust with victims, especially those targeted through cyber-enabled crimes, were discussed. Encouraging victims to report offenses was deemed vital for achieving justice and safety.

International Tools: The use of international tools, such as the Prüm biometric exchange system, was highlighted as valuable for sharing data across borders and aiding investigations.

This comprehensive overview underscores the multifaceted nature of addressing violence against women and girls. It emphasised the importance of a collaborative, informed, and empathetic approach in law enforcement practices.

Combating Violence Against Women and Girls - An International Perspective

The third workshop, delivered with our partners at the National Forensic Science University of India, took an international perspective on addressing Violence Against Women and Girls. The workshop featured experts from various countries who explored several key topics, including the impact of COVID-19, education, community policing, and the role of technology. The panel included:

Professor (Dr) Purvi Pokhariya Campus Director at the National Forensic Science University of the Delhi Campus. Director of the Academics, Research and Consultancy at the National Forensic Sciences University, Gandhinagar. 

Dr Jeevan Thaigarajah CEO with extensive experience in areas such as minority rights, multiculturalism, governance, and human rights, highlighted the impact of COVID-19 on domestic and societal issues. 

Dr Katarzyna Kowalska, Ph.D. in law, Assistant Professor WSKZ Wroclaw, Legal Counsel

based in Poland, works with vulnerable groups, such as homeless people, victims of violence, and those living with HIV. 

Nupur, from the Centre for Social Justice, shared her experiences in collaborating with the police and their role in addressing violence against women. 

Parm Sandhu, a former Chief Superintendent in London with extensive experience in domestic violence and violence against women and girls, emphasised the complexity of addressing violence against women.

Here are the essential insights:

Leadership Requirements: The discussion highlighted essential qualities and approaches for senior police leadership in handling VAWG. These include empathy, professionalism, support, collaboration, balancing masculinity and femininity, a care-based approach, robust detection procedures, a multi-disciplinary approach, expertise, and research and development.

Effective Policing: Effective policing involves community engagement, striking a balance between victim support and successful prosecutions, providing mental health support for police officers, responsible use of technology in law enforcement, cyber safety for young women and girls, preventive mechanisms, social responsibility, and the importance of a collaborative approach involving law enforcement, communities, families, and society at large.

Digital Policing and Cyber Security: The panel discussed issues related to cybersecurity and digital investigation in the context of VAWG. Key points included concerns about technology misuse by offenders, responsible handling of digital evidence, outdated legislation, the importance of social prevention and education, promoting cyber hygiene, addressing the influence of social media influencers, community policing, the use of digital technology for investigations, and the broader issue of gender-based violence.

The workshop provided a comprehensive overview of the challenges and strategies related to combating VAWG. It emphasized the importance of proactive measures, responsible technology use, and a collaborative approach involving law enforcement, communities, and society at large. The insights shared by the panellists underscore the need for a holistic response to ensure the safety and security of women and girls in a rapidly changing world.

Enhancing Digital Skills Training for Law Enforcement Officers

The fourth workshop, chaired by Stuart Hyde QPM, focused on enhancing digital skills training for law enforcement officers, recognizing the crucial role of digital skills in modern policing. The panel included:

Stuart Hyde QPM: The moderator of the seminar, a retired police officer with 30 years of service in different law enforcement agencies. His experience includes extensive international policing consultancy and digital forensics.

Craig Huldie: A former Crime Scene Coordinator with just under 30 years of service with Northumbria Police. Craig is currently self-employed focusing on Digital Forensics and travels the world delivering investigation training.

Dean Watkinson: With 30 years of police service in the East Midlands area, Dean specialised in cybercrime investigations and now works with CCL Solutions Group based in Stratford on Avon and alongside INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore to enhance global cybercrime capabilities.

Brian Field: A serving officer in the Metropolitan Police Service for 28 years, Brian is currently involved in teaching investigative training, has extensive experience in homicide investigations and developed a simple guide to officers about handling and seeking digital evidence.

Phil Hawksworth: Former Detective Chief Inspector, Phil worked with child rescue technologies and remains passionate about combating child sexual abuse online, working to support and deliver technical solutions across the globe

Key takeaways from this workshop include:

Training for Digital Skills: The panel stressed the importance of digital skills training for all law enforcement officers. They recommended integrating basic digital skills training into the standard curriculum for officers, covering various aspects of digital investigations, digital forensics, handling digital evidence, and legal and ethical considerations.

Challenges in Digital Investigations: The challenges faced by law enforcement officers in digital investigations, particularly when dealing with child abuse images, were discussed. Proper handling and preservation of digital evidence were emphasized, along with the use of triage tools to reduce officers' exposure to disturbing content.

Peer-to-Peer Networks and Challenges: The panel explored the evolution of digital crimes, focusing on the use of peer-to-peer networks for sharing illegal content. They highlighted the importance of advanced technologies like hashing and tools like the Child Abuse Image Database (CAID) to efficiently identify and classify child abuse images while minimizing officers' exposure.

Protecting Officers: The psychological toll on officers involved in digital investigations, particularly when exposed to disturbing content, was acknowledged. The panel stressed the need for psychological support, protective measures, and comprehensive training to safeguard officers' well-being.

The integration of digital skills into mainstream policing is crucial to address the growing digital component in criminal activities. Law enforcement agencies need to invest in training, technology, and support to ensure that officers can effectively combat digital crimes while protecting their mental health. As technology continues to advance, officers must be equipped with the necessary skills and support to serve justice and safeguard their well-being.

Cyber Policing Challenges in the Era of AI and the Dark Web

The fifth workshop, also delivered in partnership with the National Forensic Science University of India, delved into the evolving landscape of cybercrime, the implications of Artificial Intelligence (AI) on law enforcement, and the challenges faced by law enforcement agencies (LEAs). The panel included:

Dr Naveen Kumar Chaudhary Professor of Cyber Security and Dean, at National Forensic Sciences University, Gandhinagar, India.

Nilay Mistry Faculty of Digital Forensics and Cyber Security in the Institute of Forensic Science at World's First of its Kind, National Forensic Sciences University.

Dr Digvijaysinh M. Rathod (PhD Computer Science and Application) Associate Professor and Associate Dean, School of Cyber Security and Digital Forensics & Head, Centre of Excellence Cyber Security National Forensics Sciences University. 

Prof. (Dr) S. O. Junare M.Com.; M. Phil.; MBA; LLB (Spl.), FDPM (IIMA), Ph.D. Campus Director, National Forensic Sciences University, Gandhinagar Campus, Gujarat India

Dr J. M. Vyas is the founder Vice Chancellor National Forensic Sciences University (NFSU)

Stuart Hyde QPM is a leading consultant with the London Policing College having served at all ranks within UK policing including Chief Constable. 

Here are the key findings and discussions:

Evolving AI and the Dark Web: Both AI and the Dark Web are continually evolving, presenting significant challenges that require collective efforts to address. AI technology can be used for both lawful and malicious purposes, including ransomware and identity theft.

Challenges in Combating Cybercrime: Cryptocurrency's decentralisation and cross-border nature present challenges for law enforcement, necessitating improved forensic capacity to track illicit financial transactions. The role of social media as a tool for criminals requires law enforcement to adapt to identify and track online offenders.

Possible Solutions and the Way Forward: To effectively combat cybercrime in the era of AI and the Dark Web, law enforcement agencies and officers should invest in technology education and training. Collaboration with external partners, including the private sector and academia, is essential to develop effective solutions and stay current with technological advancements.

The workshop underscored the growing influence of AI and the Dark Web on cybercrime and the challenges they pose to law enforcement agencies. To address these challenges effectively, law enforcement agencies should prioritize technology education, training, and collaboration with external partners. Investing in digital awareness and skills is crucial to adapt to the evolving landscape of cybercrime and ensure that law enforcement remains effective and secure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conference 2023: 5th International Police Education Conference

2023

The London Policing College 5th International Conference planned for November 2023 will examine how improvements can be made on the significant and sustained drop in trust and confidence in UK policing, in particular the erosion of trust and confidence from women in the ability and focus of police to respond to issues of violence against women and girls. The increased use of Cyber and digital approaches has changed crimes which, coupled with changes in tactics used for Protest, has resulted in a need to rebalance focus and priorities.  Our aim is on how to assist the frontline officers by identifying and introducing changes to improve their ability to provide exceptional service. 

Building on our 4 international conferences and the aims from our 2022 conference last year, we aim to find solutions to support police leaders instigate the step change and force realignments required to address violence, embracing digitalisation, manage protest  and be recognised as being on the side of the citizen. Putting the complex and important issues of internal police culture aside we will focus on the improvement in terms of service delivery in the three areas where police performance needs to improve to achieve the expectations of the public:

  1. Enhancing the response to public protest, reflecting the concerns raised by the public about the use of force particularly with regard to new forms of non-violent protest which are causing significant impact and risk to the public.
  2. The effective arrest, investigation and prosecution of sexual violent offenders and those involved in coercive control through domestic and inter familial violence.
  3. Effective response to the large number of cyber enabled crimes, increasing cyber security and using digital evidence proportionately and effectively.

 

The approach for 2023

Building on our experience and the outcome from our previous conferences, this year we will follow a pattern of UK and International workshops, feeding into the conference with the intention of designing real outcomes for police professionals. These will be supported by calls for papers and short podcasts where individuals with different views will be interviewed to provide their perspectives The workshops will be blended with online and in person delegates interacting with a panel of experts. These together with our feedback from projects we have led over the past year to test ideas which we have developed from the learning. In particular we will consider our delivery of a project to enhance digital investigations in cases of Human Trafficking, our development of new digital products and approaches for students and our views on the development of AI and technologies on the police engagement with protestors, vulnerable victims and suspects.

The workshops will run from the 3rd to the 19th October and the Conference will be held on the 9th November 2023 at a central London location. Each workshop will comprise a UK and an international session which will be online and available to book through eventbrite. The conference will comprise three days with in person workshops on the 8th November and an International event on the 10th.

 


The Workshops

Policing public order - Principles of Communication – Workshop Director Roger Gomm QPM 
 

On 3rd October 2023 the workshop will consider the new approach to public protest. The protest base is changing and as policing has been embroiled in controversy and scandal, become more detached from public expectations regarding violence and is pushing the boundaries regarding privacy the risks to public confidence are growing. To consider:

  • Intelligence, communications and prevention. New approaches to maximise the effectiveness of the police to facilitate lawful protest, identify and isolate those causing crimes.
  • Cyber security in public protest. The future risks to infrastructure and systems through cyber-attack, the coordination of protesters to achieve criminal aims and the disruption of services through other technical systems (drones, robots and AI).
  • Digital opportunities to enhance communication. Using social media, AI and digital channels to enhance communication with protesters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The aim, to improve public perception by managing public protest with the minimum use of force, managing the ability to demonstrate with the impact on public.

For further details and to book a place go to:

Policing public order - Principle of Communication Tickets, Tue 3 Oct 2023 at 09:50 | Eventbrite

A further International workshop will consider the same concepts involving colleagues from Australia, New Zealand and Europe. This will be at 13:50 BST on the same day.

For further details go to:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/x/policing-public-order-principle-of-communication-international-tickets-717192029667 

Violence Against Women and Girls Operational and Academic Perspectives – Workshop Director Parm Sandhu MSc
 

On 10th October 2023 the workshop will consider how police provide services to women and girls. To consider:

  • The resources required to achieve a policing model which properly addresses crimes of sexual and domestic violence. Where will the staff come from and how can effectiveness be improved?
  • The impact on public confidence of failure to properly address such crimes and the potential of partnerships and greater work with third sector organisations.
  • Digital solutions including the use of advice and reporting portals, evidence capture and enhancing personal safety. Developing the concept of personal cyber security.

Working with our partners the National Forensic Science UN we are holding a further workshop to consider the same aspects form an international perspective. This workshop will include practitioners and academics from Sri Lanka, Cambodia, India and other countries from the region. The workshop will be chaired by Professor (Dr) Purvi Pokhariya the Director of the Academics, Research and Consultancy at the National Forensic Sciences University, Gandhinagar. Prof. Pokhariyal is also the founding Dean of the School of Law, Forensic Justice and Policy Studies and the Dean of the School of Behavioural Forensics at the National Forensic Sciences University, Gandhinagar. Renowned for her work in international academic prevention with experience and passion for VAWG. 

The aim, to improve confidence in police by improving performance, proper resourcing of teams dealing with the most complex and difficult investigations.

For further details and to book a place go to:

Violence Against Women and Girls Operational and Academic Perspectives Tickets, Tue 10 Oct 2023 at 13:50 | Eventbrite

The International workshop will be on Tuesday the 10th Oct at 9:15am BST. For further details and to book a place go to:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/x/international-violence-against-women-girls-operational-and-academic-views-tickets-717198047667 

 

Cybercrime and Digitalisation in Policing – Workshop Director Dr Stuart Hyde QPM

 

On 17th October 2023 between 10am and 12noon  the workshop will consider how to make the most out of digital forensics To consider:

  1. What Police Officers and PCSOs can do prior to submitting items or requests for digital forensic analysis.
  2. What do you need, in order to prepare a device for submission, find it, ensure that is authentic and attributed to someone, secured and ready to go?
  3. What can you do with the outcome of an examination that may reveal a mass of data?

We have gathered a panel to address these issues chaired by Stuart Hyde QPM, the panel will consist of the Met Police, CCL, Child Rescue and CKH Forensics

The seminar will explore the issues leading up to, and subsequent to a digital forensics’ examination of devices . Digital Forensics is now a highly skilled process that is properly controlled and regulated.

To make the most out of digital forensics, Police Officers and PCSOs need to deliver devices in the right way and be able to manage the output effectively. This seminar will address some of those issues from a very practical perspective. We will also consider the A SMART TRICK – The modern crime scene that will help you cope in this new digital world

The aim, to identify how to effectively harness the opportunities from digital media to improve performance and increase public confidence.        

For further details and to book a place go to:

Cyber Crime and Digitalisation in Policing Tickets, Tue 17 Oct 2023 at 09:45 | Eventbrite

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Conference 3 day event 
– Director Rod Jarman QPM OStJ

9th to 11th November 2023
University of West London

 

The International Conference will will have two workshops specifically focused on international delegates and a main conference which will be held at the University of West London.

9th November 2023

The context for international delegates.

The aim of the international workshop is to consider the reviews in the UK and the response by forces, the experience in other countries and the underlying issues which have led policing to this position. The workshop will include a review of three projects:

  1. Transnational approaches to address modern slavery through effective digital investigations
  2. International cooperation to enhance cyber security for victims of Domestic Violence and coercive control.
  3. The role of international police education in improving police response to crises and protest .

10th November 2023

Leading Police Improvement

The main conference day will be solution focussed identifying concrete actions to enhance performance. The theme through the day will be to understand the interplay between changes in digital capabilities and threats to policing in general, the response to VAWG and tactics for addressing public protest. A key outcome from last year’s conference was the balance between specialism and leadership skills. This year we intend to explore this further to identify where capability and resourcing decisions are most critical and how the required resources can be achieved. This will undoubtedly include discussions about police education, skills levels and the options available. Fundamental aspects of Human Rights and clarity of policing missions have been challenged and the conference will provide a safe space for senior leaders and colleagues to discuss options. Currently police leaders are addressing the outcomes from the reviews, challenging underperforming officers, reacting to the new policing context and at the same time addressing welfare, moral and welfare issues of their staff. The challenge is to find a route out of this ‘quagmire’ of problems which will enhance performance, build confidence and support hard working officers. The aim of this conference is to help them in that task by considering what success might entail and how it can be achieved.

The approach will build on the three exemplar programmes from day 1, with a series of short keynote speeches followed by facilitated conversations involving the delegates and panels comprising decision makers, researchers and private sector leads. The outcome will be recommendations to support improvement of police services. The day will conclude with an interview of a key police leader on their experiences and how these have helped them approach the issues.

11th November 2023

UK policing exemplars.

The third day is aimed at international delegates and provide an opportunity for them to experience UK policing through visits to projects, operations and facilitated discussions. This will end with a final international workshop on what has been learnt and any final thoughts for the future.

Images from 2022

Images from 2022 International workshop

Image form 2022 conference

2022 International deleagtes

Outcomes from day 1

Conference

International context setting

The Context

2022 Conference

The London Policing Conference 2022 considered outcomes from the Strategic Review of Policing -Police Foundation https://www.policingreview.org.uk/. The conference involved more than 1,000 delegates from over 30 countries and with extensive discussions about the challenges to policing in the 21st Century. The workshops in the UK and Internationally analysed the issues of police legitimacy and performance that Forces across the globe are struggling with. There are challenges and indeed failures of service in relation to violence against women and girls (VAWG), effective response to new paradigms of digital media including images to artificial intelligence and activity to manage changing methods of public protest. Forces are unable to meet demand, expectation and provide accountability. One theme identified was a failure of forces to adapt quickly enough to the changing set of expectations and demands.

  1. Aims to prioritise violence against women and girls and abuse are not supported by an uplift of appropriately trained resources to respond quickly and effectively.
  2. Objectives to deal with the impact of digitalisation do not include investment in the skills of staff to manage investigations effectively and proportionately.
  3. Politicalisation of Forces linked to governmental aims is eroding police independence impacting on legal demonstration and democracy.

The last year has seen greater focus on the police response to VAWG, demonstration and investigation. The Casey Review (The_Casey_Review_Report.pdf  )and the HMICFRS reviews into vetting (Vetting, misconduct and misogyny in the police service ) and corruption (Metropolitan Police's approach to corruption not fit for purpose ) provide a comprehensive evaluation of the challenges. Whilst these paint a grim and serious context we believe that through openness and engagement we can look to improve performance and this years conference will focus on what we can do to improve the position. Through the outcomes of the 2022 conference, we developed new understandings of the impact of digital technologies which we have been able to build into our work:

  • How these are used to control and coerce women, girls and other vulnerable people. Leading us to develop our education projects to be focussed on the needs of the victim, increasing personal cyber security and reducing risk.
  • The differentiation between the capabilities required to carryout digital forensic enquiries, digital media investigations and frontline investigations. Digital investigation and cybercrime have been seen as the remit of experts; more and more it is becoming part of all investigations, police operations and actions. We have built this into a transnational project to enhance investigation and are launching new products for individuals, police and other investigators to raise skills and capabilities.
  • The issues of proportionality in investigations, operations and police actions when managing digital data. The UK National Decision-Making (NDM) approach provides a framework, but officers need greater clarity on what is proportionate. We have developed a tool using the NDM and human rights framework to provide a way of articulating and defending decisions which we have built into projects.

These concepts and the outcome of the work will be trailed through this year’s conference where we hope to enhance our understanding, test the approaches and look for new insights to help police prepare for the digital developments coming.

 

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